Lit Lesson #16: Going the distance, emotionally, with Peter Taylor

“..the American writer, who, more than any other, has achieved utter mastery in short fiction.”    ~ The Washington Post Pulitzer Prize winner, Peter Taylor is a writer I did not know about until one day, when walking my dog in the forest, I was listening to The New Yorker Fiction Podcast. There he was, being read by Marissa Silver, …

Lit Lesson #15: Close Reading & Mary Lavin

  “One of the finest short story writers of the twentieth century.” ~ Joyce Carol Oats   Mary Lavin, first published in 1967, wrote about women in states of solitude and independence. She was considered avant-garde in her time, but I find her writing to be particularly poignant today, amidst the chaos of change between men and women. This free …

Lit Lesson #14: Show, don’t tell

We’ve all heard the adage, “Show don’t tell,” but what does this mean exactly? I believe it is a phrase teachers use to say write a scene instead of telling me about a scene. But what does a scene look like and how is it different from summary? What are the proportion in good writing? Is this something that can …

Lit Lesson #13: George Saunders, Transcendent or just Experimental?

The Summer Studio has been very busy reading, thinking and talking about the collected work of George Saunders. I believe he potentially represents a new order of writer, someone who could possibly take literature beyond the five hundred year log jam of ego based writing (see Christopher Booker’s Seven Basic Plots, Chapter 21). We will be studying Booker and this …

Lit Lesson #12: Writers are Drawn to Drama

Luna and I, in the park this morning. Her after squirrels, the elusive foe, and me listening to a short by Eudora Welty. Where is this Voice Coming From?, was written after the shooting of civil rights activist, Medgar Evers. Welty’s story ran in The New Yorker a month later, and is from the point of view of the white supremacist who …

Lit Lesson #11: Getting Published

  The Blackbird Studio hosted two former students, Kate Hope Day and Jody Little, to talk about their recent success in publishing. They secured multiple book deals but it wasn’t an easy process. How did they do it? What can you learn from their experience? What kept them from giving up? All these questions and more are here, on a …

Lit Lesson #10: Michael McGregor on Craft and Process

Michael McGregor~author, professor, journalist, consultant, angler and just every day good guy~stopped by the Studio on March 1, 2018, to talk about craft. We ended up having a deep conversation about memoir and how that form of writing is so self-revealing which is so important for the artist. “You have to go there,” McGregor told the students. “If you don’t, you …

Lit Lesson #9: The Power of Destabilization

George Saunders is on the following two podcasts:  Literary Arts and First Draft. This man is a Master Teacher and I hope all the students of the Studio’s take a moment to listen to what he has to say about 1) Being an artist (which you are. We all are.), and 2) process. “Your job as a writer is to always destabilize …

Lit Lesson #8: Defamiliarization

This from The Literature Glossary: Defamiliarization Definition: Defamiliarization refers to a writer’s taking an everyday object that we all recognize and, with a wave of his or her authorial magic wand, rendering that same object weirdly unfamiliar to us—strange even. Presto change-o, our perspective shifts and we see the object in a new way. A pretty neat magic trick, if …

Lit Lesson #7: Pure Observation III

By now you’ve had several weeks to practice this hinky little exercise that shows you just how invasive your mind is when it comes to seeing people and places, and hearing what other people have to say. I know it’s hard not to interpret, judge, evaluate, interject, explain, and basically impose your thoughts on the experience but remember, the job …