Lit Lesson #4 – Get Published

If you are a writer studying at the Studio, you know I’ve been promising a resource list to help ease your way toward submitting your work. It’s here, at last, and I must thank Joseph from Studio III, because he pulled it all together for me.

Many balk at submitting, due to the fear. IE:  You might believe your work is not good enough yet, or you have a terror of rejection.  But submitting, ironically, is a terrific way to get over your fears. Once you start the process, you’ll soon demystify it and discover submitting is just like any other aspect of writing—tedious, confusing, non-sensical, and then (when you suddenly get published), thrilling!!!

Below are four resources, along with Joseph’s words of advice based on experience:

  1.  CRWROPPS, is set up as a yahoo group. When you click on this link, about halfway down is a button you can click that says “join group.” 

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CRWROPPS-B/info

If you sign up for this one, you receive a lot of emails each week, when they come there are about 10 or so per day. I look quickly through these emails, and delete all the ones that say “poetry” because I (Joseph), am not going to write poems. “Some days,” he writes, “I just can’t deal, so I delete all the emails, and then other times I look through and see if there’s anything interesting.”

      2.  Duotrope has a free trial but is a pay service ($50 per year) and you have the ability to filter what you receive. It’s nice because it separates into paying and non-paying markets, it lists contests, with entry or submission fees, genre, topic submission calls, and on and on. I guess the worst part is that it’s a pay service.

       https://duotrope.com/

     3.  Submittable is a website for submission management, and it’s what most publications require you submit through. It’s free, and it’s really nice because it keeps track of your submissions for you — where you submitted, when, and the status (accepted, rejected, pending). They also have a newsletter with calls, but it’s not as helpful as the others (in my opinion):

      https://www.submittable.com/

    4.  Lastly, a place I get a lot of general literary news, articles, interesting published pieces, writing on writing, etc., is a place called Literary Hub. Again, it’s a daily email in which are usually 10 to 20 links to anything “literary” that’s out there. This is where I came across the article about the woman reading David Foster Wallace for the first time.

          http://lithub.com/

Thank you again, Joseph!  Incredible information.

To everyone who is reading this blog: SUBMIT!

 

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